Sn8kfrm

First off, I know that iDye may not be the best choice for Shibori-style tie-dyeing, but it’s what I have until I use it all up. 

I utilize the stovetop method and am very meticulous with the instructions. 

What are the best steps that I can embrace to help with back staining? I’ve done two rounds of linen towels, pre-washed, shibori style dyed, and even after rinsing excess dye out prior to a wash in the washing machine (remember I am dyeing stovetop method), AND using the iDye fixative, I still get a lot of back staining in the white areas. I’ve read that time, heat, salt, water quality and other factors play a part in it all. 

What can I do, specifically using the iDye packets for natural fabrics to assist with back staining? Advice is much appreciated! Thank you in advance! 

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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
You need a more color safe detergent that specifically helps with backstaining.  You aren't doing anything wrong, it is just a direct dye like idye tends to be quite stainy and that is why people use procion or Indigo for shibori with more success(an often better colors).  Idye is best for overdyeing.  

No worry though.  You should be able to solve this.  I would get some synthrapol which is specifically meant to prevent backstaining.  What it does is it grabs that dye and washes it down the drain before it can stain.  I would do a wash with synthrapol before you use the fixative.  It will get out all that dye that is not fixed at all in the fiber.  Then you can use the fixative to lock the dye that is in for the long term.

Alternatively, Solar Fast wash works great too.  I think it might be better than synthrapol.  As a cheaper household option, you can also try baby shampoo, which works pretty well, but not as well as these 2 others.  It's not unusual rinsing Idye can be challenging, and it strikes so fast when it is in the water and you don't have a good color sequestering detergent, it will stain.  

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Sn8kfrm

Thank you so much for your helpful insight. I actually just purchased synthrapol and it’s in my mailbox now. I’ll look for the Solar Fast wash as well and try it for comparison. 

What temperature water should I be using for rinsing excess dye prior to the synthrapol wash? Does that matter much? 


Thanks again. 

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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
This does matter.  This changes depending on the type of dye.  Really, reactive dyes like our silk colors or Procion MX dyes can be rinsed with hot water with no ill effects.  Idye is a direct dye and the difference between direct and reactive dyes is that direct dye just get stuck in the fabric, and the reactive dyes are chemically bonded to the fiber.  That means all the dye that comes out of the reactive project is unfixed dye that could stain, but fixed dye is never going to wash out no matter the temp.  For direct dyes like idye, hot water loosens the fiber, and then the "stuck" dye can escape and stain.

So, you shoudl really only rinse Idye in cold water.  You are actually losing some of the color when you wash in hot, and for that reason it seems like it never rinses out.  It's also the reason you should always wash it in cold water.  Idye fixative which helps the dye stay in the fiber with positively charged ions, is also a good idea for Idyed items, especially if they are t-shirts or other clothing that gets washed all the time.  It will really help maintain the color.  

Reactive dye - ok to wash in hot water

Direct dyes, Indigo dye, and especially red acid dyes should be washed cold.  
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Sn8kfrm
Thank you again for the help! I will be trying another batch of linen towels tomorrow and will rinse/wash in cold and try the synthrapol too. 
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Post pics if you can!
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Sn8kfrm
I can do that. They’re in the wash with the fixative now but I can already say that all white areas have turned pinkish. I dyed with the crimson color. And I bet it’s for two reasons...Not rinsing well enough prior to wash and then washing with the synthrapol in hot. I rinsed with cool water for sure but should’ve re-read your comment about always washing in cold. I followed the instructions on the Syn. bottle that said to wash in hot. Sigh. Good news is, I have lots of iDye packets and linen to try again! But I will still post pics once they get dried!
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detobias detobias
Just want to verify that all you applies only to idye and NOT idye poly?  
As you know I dye poly velvet with idye poly and have had trouble with the red dye especially not rinsing out. I dye in very hot presto pot or skillet and cook several hours then rinse in cold  til  clear as I can get. 
Do you have recommendation for a nice teal with idye poly?  Green or  kelly with blue?
thanks. Dianne
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Sn8kfrm
Here are pictures! The first two show the bright white prior to washing (I should have continued to rinse after unfolding) and the last two are the finished products. They're all for me and I still think they're cool looking. But I WILL try again. Possibly today!
IMG_7715.jpg  IMG_7724.jpg  IMG_7752.jpg  IMG_7753.jpg 
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Wow definitely a lot of backstaining.  Gotta try cold water and synthrapol.  Good news is that one of us here at jacquard has been making things like these with Idye and is getting good whites using Synthrapol.  
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Just want to verify that all you applies only to idye and NOT idye poly?  
As you know I dye poly velvet with idye poly and have had trouble with the red dye especially not rinsing out. I dye in very hot presto pot or skillet and cook several hours then rinse in cold  til  clear as I can get. 
Do you have recommendation for a nice teal with idye poly?  Green or  kelly with blue?
thanks. Dianne


I know.  You are using synntrapol though on it, arent you?  Hot water can definitely continuously wash out the poly.  YOu shoudl only wash Idye poly in cold water since it is activated by heat.  

A wash with soda ash or Oxyclean is a good idea to scour the surface for unfixed poly.  The other thing to do is simply reduce your amount of dye until you start losing color. Use as little as possible.

There is more than one way to get Teal.  Ideally you want to use Blue and Yellow.  Star twith a 9:1 ratio of blue to yellow.  If it is too green keep moving blue.  Usually if you want a dark teal you will need some black.  It is one of the few colors i actually use black for.   I usually add 1/20 or 5% black just to deepen it  
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Sn8kfrm
For the record, I did use the synthrapol - but didn't wash in cold with it. I'm already folding more fabric to try again this weekend! I'll post results once I get it all done! Have a great weekend.
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detobias detobias
No have never used synthropol on poly. Should I before dyeing as with wool?
Alex suggests oxyclean and soda ash about a year ago for the bleeding of my deep reds but it didn’t make a difference 😒

Dianne Tobias
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