empathy44 empathy44
Hi,

I have tried dyeing Alpaca using acid dyes, but they always come out much lighter/less intense than wool--even when dyed at the same time as wool. I can't help feeling there must be some trick to either open up the fiber to the dye or cause more dye to bond to it.
Thanks
Lisa
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Borie Borie
Hi,

I'm new to this group and to dying all together, but because alpaca is a natural fiber, maybe there is still some oil in the fiber. Try to wash some and dye it.

Good luck,
Borie
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Celia Buchanan Celia Buchanan
Hi,
Acid dye will work. Wash the wool thoroughly in hot water before dyeing with synthrapol to remove any oils.
Here is a link to the dye instructions.
[url]http://www.jacquardproducts.com/products/dyes/aciddye/instructions1.php[/url]
Celia
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empathy44 empathy44
I always wash my fiber with synthrapol before dyeing and put a bit in the dye water as well. I don't know why alpaca is so different than wool, but it seems to be.

Actually, I found out that if I dyed the fiber at a higher temperature and for a longer period of time it did a wonderful job.
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Dyeingtofelt Dyeingtofelt
Thanks for the suggestions. Yes, the fiber is washed and I do use synthrapol. Alpaca is a lanolin/oil free fiber. I am a bit sporadic about checking dyebath temperatures. I will try again and check the temperature (should be 180 degrees) and let it cool overnight in the pot. I really need red and scralet for the holiday season!!
Lisa, thanks for the info about wool - (I have not dyed wool) only alpaca since I have a herd of 26!!! I have also dyed mohair and silk with the same dye with great results.
Have any of you used the Jacquard iDye fixative?
Louise
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babou123 babou123
Dyeingtofelt wrote:
Thanks for the suggestions. Yes, the fiber is washed and I do use synthrapol. Alpaca is a lanolin/oil free fiber. I am a bit sporadic about checking dyebath temperatures. I will try again and check the temperature (should be 180 degrees) and let it cool overnight in the pot. I really need red and scralet for the holiday season!!
Lisa, thanks for the info about wool - (I have not dyed wool) only alpaca since I have a herd of 26!!! I have also dyed mohair and silk with the same dye with great results.
Have any of you used the Jacquard iDye fixative?
Louise


I am new to dying, and would love so much to know what I should use to dye tibetan lamb and mohair, still on the leather, so I cannot use hot water as the leather will become dry. This is all to make doll wigs of different colors.
Your answer will be much appreciated.
Thanks,
Helene
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vlyons vlyons
washing the dirt out with very hot tap water is the key. I first skirt the fleece to remove the VM, coarse fiber, and really dirty base of neck fiber. No actually, I use a blower BEFORE shearing to remove dirt. I wash and rinse 3 times. the last wash gets 2 rinses. When dyeing turn up the heat to be just below the boiling point. Then you have 2 options. Either add more dye to get a more saturated color, or use a darker red, blue, green purple or whatever color you want. A lot of hand dyeing is trial & error. I'm usually pleased with whatever I get, even if not what I expected. It's all pretty.
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jacquardproducts
Original Post Date: October 9, 2018
User: SouthBayMaker

It is the nature of the fiber. Alpaca has " less points of dye fixing" than wool. It is perfectly normal. No problem with oils or dirt. I typically work at the Lowest pH (2.5 for leveling dyes) and high temperature (195 F) for obtaining the brightest color possible.
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