CurlyHairedGirl

I’m wanting to do a very diluted form of sprinkle dye of several colors in the same family. Like blues or pinks.

The base fabric may be white or a light version of that family. 

The look I’m wanting is something like a whole lot of little specks or a lot of little splotches. Like an impressionist painting from someone like Monet or Seurat. 

I know that other dye manufacturers often dilute some of their Procion dyes somehow. So that the dye appears cheaper but that you have to use more of it. What do they blend in? Either something that doesn’t interfere with dye or something that enhances it. 


Since I’m using salt shakers, salt would be one possibility. I know that enhances dye. But I’ve heard that shakers interfere with the dye components differently and so the appearance changes over time. 


I probably will be folding over several layers of fabric (4-8?) so one possibility for diluting is to just spray and let the water push dye to the bottom layer. Then flip and spray to  put the dye the other direction.  Will spraying water be more likely to let dye drip through layers or across the same layer?  



Quote 0 0
detobias detobias
I realize this doesn’t apply since I use idye poly on stretch velvet but couldn’t resist commenting. I had wanted to use a shaker to get sprinkle effect for years. Because there is no mordant for idye poly the dilution factor created difficulty.
E33A191F-0A01-4C3A-BFBF-D7A86860466C.jpeg  Just recently I have experimented with an electric pressure cooker to get the temp higher and with less water. The last effort I sprinkled whatever was in the dye shaker and this is result. I am thrilled with the possibilities! Now looking for a commercial rectangular pressure cooker where I could lay down the velvet to limit the undyed white areas. 
Quote 0 0
CurlyHairedGirl
I love that color effect.
Quote 0 0
Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Yeah salt is probably fine.  We did a shelf test on this and it seemed to make no effect over the course of 1 year. The actual salt the use to cut the dye is not the same, but that is because regular salt can destroy stainless steel over time(usually only a problem in industrial settings).  Sodium Sulfate can also be used. For other dyes sometimes people use dextrin, but this is not appropriate for Procion dye. 
Quote 0 0