detobias detobias
i find the dye dark blue for a few minutes in hot water but dyes my fabric a beautiful turquoise. Is there a chemical reaction happening?
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
It's a good question.  Really what is going on is physical reaction.  We made pens of this stuff once so that we could have a fabric marker you drew on and then ironed to set it on polyester.  The colors all look terrible when you draw with them, and then they would pop like crazy once they were ironed.  You can do this with the dry powder.  It makes a mess, but I poured some dry powder on a poly piece of fabric and started ironing it.  It started making blue gas, but it also adhered to the shirt and brightened up from grey like you wouldn't believe.  

Whats happening is that a thick layer looks like garbage, but when the fine single layer on the fabric is glazed on there, it looks bright and clean.  This is why it is so important to get that temp up as high as possible to activate it turning into a gas, so that it can put that super thin layer over the fiber.
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detobias detobias
Thanks. Yes realize reaction is gas and temp important. But the dramatic difference in the original blue and the the endpoint  with the turquoise dye really surprised me and I haven’t seen that with any of the other idye poly colors. Have you seen it?
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Yes, I did a "tie-dye with the poly dye"  I just put it in squirt bottles with water, squirted it on and then Ironed it to set it on polyester.  

So, the color when it went on was incredibly dull.  It was grey, and looked terrible.  As soon as I applied the heat, it brightened up and looked great.  Here is a picture.  Both dyes are present turquoise and violet.  they both look grey.  The colored area I ironed, and the grey part I did not.  It's dramatic.  
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