Marjliff
I’m having an issue with both the deep purple and lilac dyes bleeding turquoise like blue around the edges. At first I thought it was because they were not freshly made so I made a new batch of each dye and it still happened. I shook the dye really really well but that didn’t help. Any idea why this is happening?
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
I am sorry, which dye is this?  Anything peculiar about the fabric?  Which fabric are you using?  Have you used these before and not had this happen?  

If this is procion, was it immersion or batch dyed?
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Marjliff
It’s the Procion lilac and dark purple dyes. Using them to tie dye. It happens on both my 100% cotton and my cotton blends. This is 100% cotton... thanks for any tips you can provide!073E9524-1822-419A-9B4E-628CDF63D651.jpeg 
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
That is really interesting.  So, this is "cracking" where a mixture of colors strike differently on fabric when batched and you are getting a separation of the colors.  

Now, there are pure colors like this.  Our violet # 231 is a pure color, so it is impossible to crack.

The other thing I am seeing here is that you have a lot of white in this tie dye.  Now that is not a dealbreaker and is fine to do.  It usually means the garment was dry when the dye was applied?  That is the perfect scenario for cracking.  Because the fabric is not wet yet, the dye has to wet it and now move through it.  So, with these mixed colors, you are seeing that the turquoise is moving faster.  In chemistry we would conclude that the turquoise molecule is smaller and therefore diffuses faster.  So, you are out of luck right?  

Not necessarily.  You can improve the red portion of the migration by applying the dye to wetter fabric. that can mean just slightly damp.  

The problem is that you will get more overall diffusion meaning you are not going to get as many discreet blobs like you have here(Which look quite nice) and you will have more bleeding into colors overall.  

"cracking" can be even worse for ice dyeing.  

It really comes down to 2 options which is try on wetter fabric or switch to a pure color dye and use the violet.  You could also try to mix your own violets from colors that have a similar strike rate.  

I don't see this as much from mixtures of dyes that have more similar strike rates. That just means how fast does each set into the fabric.  So to mix a violet with similar strike rates, I suggest using Fuchsia and Bright blue.  Those are our two fastest and most intense colors.  The other good option that is less likely to crack is Turquoise and magenta.  

You know, even if you wanted to keep that high white content tie dye, you could probably solve the cracking problem just by wetting the area that you want to apply the lilac or deep purple only.  Like just squirt a little water there and then squirt the dye on.  

I hope this helps.  I know it is annoying, but just as many people love this effect and choose these cracking colors as hate it. It totally depends on your personal taste.  

If you want to make sure to use pure colors, you can consult the technical data sheet which tells you which colors are pure.  

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5ac4eb022971149bb6d709d3/t/5c01b6ed70a6ade2b1f02385/1543616237924/ProcionMX_Technical-Info-Chart.pdf

Any of these with trade names are pure. 

I will say the cerulean blue is not going to be pure in just a couple of months.  Nobody in the world is making that now because the chemistry involved led to a major explosion in India and they outlawed its production.  We won't have a pure color there until they learn to make it without volatile chemicals.  I have no idea about that.  The color is we have going forward is a blend of blues that is going to look very similar.  
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