Pamela44
I have just started marbling silk scarves and on every scarf the colors are pastel and pale.  I am using the Jacquard marbling colors.  I am mixing the size according to the instructions on the Dharma website.  Once I lay the scarf on the size, I take it out and quickly rinse it in water.  When I look at your site or at videos on Youtube, the marbling colors are very vibrant, but when I make a scarf, the scarf looks vibrant in the size, but once I take it out, it is pale.  I had made one last summer at a store, and the colors turned out very vibrant and beautiful, and the store told me they used Jacquard marbling colors.  Do you have any suggestions for me so that every scarf I make does not turn out pale colored?
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
There is more than one thing that can cause this.  #1 is just adding more color onto the size.  The colors on a large tray will spread until they reach the edges often.  that means you just need more color on the surface.  So you add and add until you actually get more color and they concentrate each other by pushing the color together.  

Are you using Dharma's carrageenan or ours?  We did change the directions on our carrageenan recently because we started using a  stronger version.  So it it was 4 teaspoons per gallon instead of 6 teaspoons per gallon.  This could make a difference.  

Small changes in the thickness of the carrageenan can make big differences in your results. I have seen this a lot especially during the winter when it is cold.  It makes the carrageenan thicker and can disrupt results.  Humidity and especially hard water can really affect it too.  

So some things to look for.  If you paint goes on and it looks like the paint immediately spreads out all over the place and you don't get circles, but they just cover the whole tray and seem to disappear that is a an indicator that your carrageenan is too thin.  If the dot of paint doesn't spread adn just sinks that is usually too thick, but can happen if it is way too thin as well.  

Ideally your black will spread about 4 inches and your colors 3-31/2 inches circles.  A little more is no big deal and a little less will result in darker colors.

As far as rinsing goes, not everyone does this the same, but on fabric I like to let the paint dry and then rinse.  You can always rinse the carrageenan off, so if you wait until the paint is dry you lose less color.  That is just my preference .    Here are some examples of my scarves below.  You should be able to
get colors like this provided your carrageenan is the proper thickness.  My guess is you just need to tweak it a little bit.  


20171119_223144.jpg  scarf1.jpg 
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Pamela44
Thank you for your quick response!  I am using Dharma's carrageenan and it says 2 tablespoons per gallon.  We do not have hard water, but we are having a cold winter.  My carrageenan is on the thicker side, so I will try thinning it to see if that helps. Does the temperature of the carrageenan make a difference? As for humidity, being winter, it is not humid.  Do I need more or less humidity?  As for my colors, all the paints do form circles.  The black and white spread to about 12 inches and because they spread so much, the color is very opaque; all other colors spread to about 5 - 6 inches.  I love your scarves in the attachment - that brightness is what I am hoping to achieve.  Here is a picture of my scarves so you can see the paleness.  The top one is how the red color turns out - very pale pink, and the purple was supposed to be a dark purple, but it's pale as well.  I will try not rinsing and rinsing once dry.  As well, I have read that instead of ironing to set the color, they can be put in the dryer for a couple hours.  Have you heard/done this or is ironing the sure-fire way?  Thank you again, I appreciate your advise.
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Ironing is better, but some people swear by the dryer move.  They do the hottest possible setting for 45 min or more. 

So I would say it sounds like your carrageenan may be a little thin.  Cold carrageenan can be a problem.  You should leave it out of the refrigerator to get to room tempo for a couple of hours before you marble if possible.  

You might consider making a slightly thicker batch, and then diluting that until you get the appropriate spread of color.  It has something to do with taste, but smaller circles will give you brighter colors.  I don't think you are too far off.  I would use something like 75% of a gallon of water and add more water if necessary.  

I think I see some color transfer on your scarves where the green is bleeding.  that can be fixed by waiting to rinse until the paint is totally dry.  
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Pamela44
Thank you.  I have thickened the carrageenan and that has helped somewhat.  I am also not rinsing immediately, I am waiting until the fabric has dried and then rinsing which has also helped.  My last question for you is the paint is extremely thin, it has the consistency of water.  Is there a way to thicken it slightly? Thanks again.
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Methocel is a good thickener that won't spoil.  You can use sodium alginate too, but I would refrigerate the paint if i use that.  You coudl also just use ourtextil extender #1 from the textile colors line
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