sophiedufort
My name is Sophie Dufort. I am a Florida artist, an accidental crafter who has developed a passion for art and challenging experiences. I started crafting about two years ago at age 48, and kept going ever since. I love, love Jacquard products. I am particularly fond of Lumiere paints, which I have been using a lot lately. Here are a couple of my creations. Mother Nature.jpg
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Wow you have used Lumiere really effectively!  What are your sculptures made from?  You have achieved making them look like real metal for sure.
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sophiedufort
The top sculpture has an aluminum and wood structure that I covered with fabric dipped in hardener then added art pebbles of different sizes. The head of that statue is made of thermoplastic. I first spray-painted the entire thing in flat black then used Lumiere metallic paints to color it. 

The mask is made as follows: the face - air dry clay, the embellishments - clay, fabric and metal. Also spray-painted in flat black before applying Lumiere paints. On the face I used mostly waxes (as opposed to the first sculpture, where I used Lumiere paints on the face as well).

I believe that spray-painting first helped a lot emphasize the beauty of the Lumiere paints. Also, on the thermoplastic face, the texture of the thermoplastic made it easier to paint, as it has that woven look that is very suitable for vibrant, shiny colors. I could have used Lumiere as well on the face of the mask, but I don't have too much experience with painting, and I was afraid that I may ruin the face by accidentally applying too much (as that one was a lot smoother).
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Mossmilldesign
Really interesting sculptures. Thermoplastic....? Is that a plastic that starts in  bead or pellet form and you drop it into boiling water to make malleable and shape it before it cools? If so, how is that to work with? How do you reheat it to continue sculpting it? I thought about trying it but worried it would be frustrating to keep reheating it. I started sculpting with eps instead and came up with my own hard coating recipe instead of an expensive commercial brand. But I love your esthetic. Nice metallic finish.
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sophiedufort
Thermoplastic does come in pellet form, but it is also supplied as a sheet that can be easily heated with a heat gun and molded over various shapes. There are different qualities of thermoplastic sheets, in that some can hold significant detail while others not so much. The sheets are expensive, but worth every penny in my view. Once heated, they become soft and malleable then they harden like rock when they cool down. They also stick to themselves, meaning that there is practically no waste, as every bit can be reused. Besides, they look beautiful when painted, as paint highlights the woven look of the thermoplastic. 
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Mossmilldesign
Hmm....very cool. I guess it would make (economical) sense to use it like a skin over a form- much like paper over a balloon in paper mache. It's cool- I'd love to play around with it- see what it's like. I've done some whisical sculpting in eps where I could use the thermoplastic for some of the accessories. Thanks for the info. I'll probably check it out.
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sophiedufort
You are welcome! Look for Worbla thermoplastic sheets. They are amazing. 
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Thank you for sharing.  Great little tutorial on your technique.  
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William Joyce
Nice this is amazing artwork looks like real artisan's work.
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