CurlyHairedGirl
This may not be the right forum, but I'm not sure what would be. I'm preparing to dye fabric for the first time and am attempting to scour fabric using synthropol and soda ash. I have 2 fat quarters in a 6 quart pot with 2 teaspoons of synthropol, and 4 teaspoons of soda ash.  A website I read said 1-2 t synthropol per gallon, and 2-3 t soda ask.

I've been simmering it on the stove for a couple hours, and I started with warmish water. I expected to see brown gunk in the water or rising to the top. The water is a tiny bit greyish, but I wasn't sure if that was caused by adding the detergent/soda. 
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
I think that might be all the gunk you will get out.  Soda ash doesn't really color the water, it can make it look whiter at high concentration.  

It just really varies from fabric to fabric how much comes out.  

It seems like a pretty long scour time.  Where did you get those directions? 
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CurlyHairedGirl
The time suggested was only 30 mins I think. It was on that long only because i was busy with other stuff.

If not much comes out, does it indicate that I don't need to take as much care with this fabric in the future, particularly if I'm interested in techniques where irregularity is desired?
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Definitely.  Most people when they scour just use some soda ash in hot wash.  Your method is better, but the added benefit is probably less than 10% better, but it is more professional.  

This is similar to using "non-iodized salt".  Is it better than iodized salt?  Yes no question.  Will you often have trouble using iodized salt?  very rarely if ever and mostly at low temps.  

Iodized salt is more likely to make insouble salts from impurities in tap water that can cause streaking.  This would be especially bad with well water, but is almost never a problem with municipal water.  Some of these "dyeing tips' you see are about elimination issues that are not big ones.  It is what a pro would do to ensure that they never ever make a mistake on the dye job and it is reproducible and predictable.  

I commend anyone trying to do things the right way, but sometimes you just want to dye something and getting a perfect dye job is not that important.  
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