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Mossmilldesign
The first one was wrapped/rolled tightly around a rope and scrunched tightly together and the ends of the rope tied to keep it tight. The second one was arashi shibori- wrapped around a 2" pipe and wrapped tightly with sinew as it was pushed together. That one was physically hard to get that tight. You have to use so much force to push all that fabric together because I used a heavy, high thread count cotton...
Many of the indigo shibori fabrics I dyed were used to make a queen size quilt for my brother who happens to live in Vancouver, BC! I wanted to make him something wholly created by me. I dyed all of the fabrics and hand printed a couple of them with original stamps I cut or carved. I only started dyeing about 3 or 4 years ago- though, I took classes in it and was good friends with my high school teacher who taught my fibers class. I had done batik and several other fiber arts- which was 35 years ago- sheesh! Can it have been that long? I feel like I'm only 30 now!  I've been a professional picture framer and pursued art and design with a passion my entire life so I do work in many different mediums, even now. I can't not do art.  20171020_124620_1508571924912_1548407366049.jpg  this is the quilt I made for my brother - I dyed and/or printed 19 different fabric pieces for it.  The guitar was a stitched design and I used it for the back of his quilt. I have done other guitars and wrapped them around stretcher bars to hang on the wall. I donated them for a fund raiser for a musician battling cancer.2d8d5050f4bb006825046af5b667580b.jpg  This other one is snow dyed. I love the dimensional effect - it looks almost like smoke. I think I got this effect because the snow was very dry and light - even though I packed it on. But it's hard to say- you just never know how it'll turn out.  20180121_225057_1516593636912.png 
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Sb
The queen size quilt for your brother is wonderful! It’s a little difficult to see the detail but I can tell there is lots of detail in each dyed piece. I hope he appreciated it. Is he a musician? The guitar was really cool. I have seen on Pinterest work done like you did the guitar and I tried it but it didn’t work and I am wondering if it is the dye and process again. Was your guitar piece dyed with indigo? I used procion Mx and it sounds like I need to experiment with other dyes for different processes. Again I think the snow experiment is a bit ahead of me yet. I went to art school (way back when too) we might be the same era. I took fabrics but got sidelined into printmaking and then I liked the metal etching better than printing and started etching glass. Really loved that but got acid burns on my fingers and stopped that. Ended up in the corporate world and after early retirement took care of mom and now I am starting to have more time for myself to explore so back to fabrics.
Here is my arashi shibori and the rope scrunch method on some old silk I had forever. I don’t have the lovely shadowing effect you have on your pieces but everything is different . I am not sure what I am going to do with them but so much fun!

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Mossmilldesign
I love your pieces- I've never done a 2 color shibori- I wouldn't know where to start. Do you dye it a solid yellow first and then fold, twist, stitch, clamp and dye it before applying the second color? I'd like to try that. What do you do with the dyed fabrics? Do you sew with them?
Most of the shibori fabrics in the quilt are indigo but I couldn't/didn't keep the vat going. Since then, I got an indigo fiber reactive dye and it's almost impossible to tell them apart. All I use is procion mx dye - I don't do any silk dyeing so I haven't delved into the Acid dyes and the natural dyes don't interest me. The guitar was dyed  with procion mx, as well. I folded the fabric in half and stitched only half the guitar with sinew. This is where sodium alginate is required. It's the only way to keep the dye where you want it and to not bleed into the tightly pulled and wrapped stitches. If there's another way, I've never found it.(And, yes, my brother is a gifted guitarist/musician but didn't pursue it professionally full time. Our dad was a professional musician in 'Vegas where we grew up.)I get great results every time as far as saturation and I've only had one piece fade because I forgot to presoak it. I've printed a lot of fabric with original stamps but I use a textile ink for that. I tried to print using dye. I had thickened the dye with alginate but I didn't get clean prints- I'm sure there's a way to do it to get the results I want but haven't had much time to experiment. I've used the Jacquard textile ink- but to be honest, I didn't like the consistency- it was too gel-like. They make a great super opaque white ink that I love- it rolls out on the platen nicely and prints well on dark colors. I mix it into some of the inks I don't like and it improves the consistency but the color is lightened by the white. I'd love to do more fabric printing but have to create a stamp that can cover more area at a time- I like smaller prints but I find the printing process tedious. 20170526_235230.jpg  PhotoEditor-1493833276122.jpg  20181022_211330-1_1540257953968.jpg these are a couple of my printed fabrics. I used 2 layers of adhesive backed craft foam sheets mounted on wood blocks and use a razor blade and a hot tool to draw the design and pull out the negative space. The last one I created with stencils and a wheat paste resist. I painted the dye on top of the dried paste and when it was completely dry, picked off as much of the dry paste as I could before washing it by hand to get the remaining paste off. I love the results but it's difficult to hold the stencil flat when you apply the paste- I used a plastic credit card to sort of spread it like frosting over the stencil and then lift the stencil carefully. You also have to clean the stencil before placing it back on the fabric. This is a process where I'd like to have a large stencil with the design cut out multiple times on the same sheet. The inks have a very soft hand on the cotton after it's washed but again, I'd really like to print with dye if I can figure out a way to do it. 
You should definitely try ice dyeing- it's stupid easy. You don't need anything extra besides ice or snow and a way to hold your fabric up and allow the melting ice to drain into the bottom of a container. It's a lot of fun and always a surprise.
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Sb
Yes, the yellow is the first color and what was supposed to be grey is the second. I think I tend to use too much dye. I know they say so much per weight of fabric but I don't have a scale and I am not strict enough in my protocol to follow rules to the letter! oops. So far I have not done anything with the fabrics. That has always prevented me from doing things in the past, I hate waste and such, but I have given myself permission now to just play with stuff.
I haven't done any indigo dyeing but I just found a group in my city that teaches some fabric techniques that I want to try out. One of them indigo. But they also have stenciling and stamping classes.  I have been dyeing in my basement and kitchen and I am battling making a mess of stuff I shouldn't. I found that if you are quick enough you can get dye out of a laminate counter top if you use oxi-clean. whew!
Your stamped pieces are wonderful! In the past I had been working on some linocuts but I broke my wrist and it doesn't have the endurance to do a lot of linocut but some small stamps might be fun.  So instead of linoleum you use the craft foam to make the stamps? What material is your stencil made of then, or the same? That would save my wrist. I will take your experience of the inks to heart if I try some of that. 
I have heard of doing stencils with chickpea paste and thought it would be fun to try that too. I don't expect it matters what type of flour you use.. I am gluten free though so it would likely be chickpea, tapioca or arrowroot. Might be interesting to try them all at the same time to compare. I can see the issue of using a small stencil and trying to reuse it constantly on the fabric when you have to clean it each time. It must also be a problem if you want to put two close together, the stencil edge would lay over the already pasted area and squash it? or would you let each layer dry first and reapply the stencil later. yeah, that makes sense. hm interesting. You have given me lots of food for thought, thank-you I really appreciate it.
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Mossmilldesign
I sometimes use linoleum block, and sometimes wood. But I like the ease of the foam and how quickly and cheaply I can make the stamps. I use very inexpensive adhesive backed foam sheets - they come in packs of 6 sheets- standard paper size- for less than $3- usually displayed with childrens craft items. It's too thin to use in a single layer, so I peel the backing from one sheet and cover a second sheet. I use small scrap wood pieces- something thick enough to hold easily when stamping. Sometimes I trace the wood on the foam and cut to size to cover one side of the wood block- or you can use scissors to cut out pieces and stick them to the block. For me, it's easier to cover the block, draw my design and use a single edge razor blade to cut around the design and pull off the negative space. For more detailed designs, I use an electric hot tool that has different tips and use is to put in detail. This needs to be done with a light hand as the foam melts quick- use ventilation but it's not too bad-- really. I use it sparingly- fine detail and to clean up a tight corner. But if it's a geometric design- using the blade is quick and easy. Both layers of foam peel up easily together. I usually make a 2 sided block- 2 stamps on one block. I roll the ink out on a platen and roll the ink on with the brayer. I use them over and over - just wash them carefully and dry them immediately. Tiny stamps don't hold up as well but if a small piece unsticks on a detailed stamp- I usually cut the small piece from scrap foam and stick it back on the stamp. The 2 rectangular stamps in both pictures are the same blocks- just showing you both sides.  20191116_105335_1573919883611.jpg  20191116_105219-1_1573919720947.jpg 
I have been unable to find any classes close to me- I would have to drive pretty far to Philadelphia and the classes usually cost hundreds of dollars at the colleges and universities- no affordable workshops and to be honest, I've used every resource to find people with similar interests in my area- very rural- in textile dyeing and printing and have come up empty handed. There are a couple of guilds for fine arts - watercolorists/oil painting- that's about it. All of my art/design projects/interests are laid back, experimental- I don't weigh or measure my dye either- and my mistakes become good pieces to do reverse dyeing with a decolorant. I check thrift stores for cotton fabric- one thrift store always seems to have brand new white 100%cotton flat sheets and I pick a couple of them up every time I go there- it's good quality, too. I don't use silk because it's too pricey for me and I'd need a different dye.
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Very interesting and instructive.  Great work.  The foam stamps seems really cool 
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Mossmilldesign
Sb, I like the repositionable/reuseable adhesive backed vinyl like they use in cricut machines but it's pricey -for cutting stencils. I tried using contact paper but it's not the quality it once was and tears easily. I found a printed repositionable vinyl wall decal sold for home decor, on clearance for next to nothing. They make great adhesive backed stencils. They don't move on the fabric when you apply your paste & the paste can't get underneath. You can reuse them over and over if you're careful with them. I do suggest making sure your fabric is held securely- the first time I tried the paste, I stapled the fabric onto stretcher bars as suggested but I prefer to use vinyl coated matboard- I can buy pretty big scraps at a variety store for 25 cents a piece. I still staple around the edge to secure the fabric but I can get the stencil and paste to the edge of the fabric. Once the paste sets enough not to drip or slide on the fabric, I take it off the matboard and use a pant hanger to let air circulate and finish drying. These are methods and materials that I've come across and experimented with that work for me. I spent so many years as a struggling single mom that it's habit to look for less costly alternatives for tools and materials but still get the results I want.  But I always spend the money on better dyes, inks and paints because they make all the difference in your finished project. 
I have a studio/workshop in our barn so I don't have to worry too much about the mess- although I tend to do a lot of dyeing in the kitchen during the cold months- my husband is a master metal worker and recently has become a great source for stainless tubs and bins so dyeing in the kitchen has become easier since I'm better equipped. Dye washes off stainless steel  easily with sos pads. 
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Sb
somehow I unfollowed my own topic but found my way back! 
I will have to look for those adhesive backed foam sheets, I am not familiar with them. it sounds like a great idea, it would take far less time to create your image. Your stamps are brilliant! I appreciate seeing what you have done with the stamps! You also make me feel better saying you don't weigh your dye as well. you are very creative and resourceful. To clarify you used the flour paste with the store bought stencil right, one of those super thin plasticky things? Then stapleing the fabric to get it tight to print and then when dry you take it off and dip the fabric to dye or paint dye on? just need clarification on that process. I guess you could do anything. thanks!

I dyed a piece of fabric but ended up making it far too dark. What do you use for a decolorant? I was thinking of using something on the dark fabric as a resist and spraying the fabric with the decolorant so that not only will I get the image but hopefully also a bit of a pattern to the background. I am not sure what consistency I would need for the decolorant though. The sheets idea is a good one. I found some cheap flour sacking tea towels that I thought would be fun to play with. The extra texture in the fabric will be another learning process. Have you used fabrics with much texture?

It is great when you have resources like your husband at your disposal, having the right equipment makes it so much easier. but you have so many great ideas, thanks
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