menandore menandore
At one point, I found a nice rayon-spandex fabric that was a plausible match for my skin tone - but regrettably, it turned out to be incredibly flimsy and didn't hold up in my costume.

I'm great with mixing bright colors from primaries, but muted colors are still something of a mystery to me.  Does anyone have suggestions for a starting point?
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
This can be tricky as people have different undertones to their skin whether it is blue, red, yellow and green.  

A good place to start with skin tones is a yellow brown sepia like color, and slowly add red to it.  That will give you a very neutral Caucasian skin color, and if you need to add undertones of any of those other colors, you can do that as well.  

Are you trying to do this with dyes or paints?  Acid dyes?

You might be able to do something like that with the acid dyes using gold ochre and cherry red.  

test to make sure you get the proportions right.  

Also, in general the way to mute out a color and make it not overwhelm your mix is to use the complementary color.

Blue gets muted by orange
red by green
purple by yellow and so on

You can mute these colors down so they are not as visible and make the whole mix more brown in the process
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menandore menandore
Fiber reactive dyes, preferably; I'm working with a cotton-spandex, so a cellulose dye that doesn't require heat would be optimal.

Ok, so I want to mix different ratios of yellow-brown with pink?  That makes sense - I can give that a try.  I was afraid red + yellow brown would end up orangey, but I suppose I can always add in a touch of blue in that case.

The only parts of my body that will be visible are my face and hands, and the skin tone fabric isn't adjacent to them, so I (thankfully) only need to come up with a match that's good enough to not be jarring.

Thanks for giving me a good starting point!  I'll give that a shot this week.
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
It will be sort of orangey. If it is too orange, just add a little blue.  The trick is to make it very light.  You probably want to use 20% less than usual dye because you want a light color.  That means about 1-2 teaspoons per lb instead of 2 tablespoons per lb
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