Stitchlord

Hello all!

I'm a costumer, and I'm getting ready to tackle Cinderella's day dress from the 2015 Cinderella movie. This was custom made, I can't find any info on the fabric but I'm thinking cotton voile, and it's dyed a very pale aqua blue.

skirtsmall.jpg 

I'm not sure what product to use for the flowers. I was thinking Dye-na flo with no-flo to keep it from spreading, but Dharma Trading tells me that won't work and they think it's commercially made fabric. This doesn't look very stiff or thick on the fabric like paints tend to, but the blue of the fabric also doesn't seem to effect the color of whatever they used to apply it. Does anyone have any suggestions for what product I could use to create this? I do have the ability to make stencils or wood block stamps.

Thank you!
~Vera

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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Hi Vera,

There is more than one way to do this, but it is complicated.  What are you starting from?  White fabric?  

You could get the blue easily from a dyeing with light cerulean blue procion dye.(this color can be removed with decolourant, Turquose not so much)  The darker blue leaves at the bottom could be done with color magnet.  That is a dye attractant that gives you a deeper color than the background.  It's almost certainly what they did here. I suggest Using 1 teaspoon of dye to get this light color.  

https://www.jacquardproducts.com/color-magnet

As for the pink, those are 3 colors.  They probably ink jet painted that.  In the old days, you would batik it or more likely have a rolling stamp with 3 different stamps with the 3 different colors.  I think what I would do is do the all the blue first.  Then go back and use dye-na-flow mixed with decolourant paste to thicken the dye na flow and remove the blue under the print at the same time.  Then you could stamp on that flower.   Paint the different colors on with paint brush onto the stamp, then transfer the design onto the blue fabric.  Then once dry, you can steam iron the stamped areas and the blue will be removed with the pink going in its place.  
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
I think your no flow solution would owrk if it weren't for the fact that the blue would still be underneath the flower area.  
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Stitchlord

Thank you, I'll play around with the color magnet, that sounds like an interesting product!

I'll definitely try a whole bunch of samples and methods first. Since I don't have the ability to print fabric I'll have to try other methods.

I had a thought, if the dye-na-flow turns water repellent after it's dried and heat set, would painting it on while the fabric is still white and then tub dyeing the fabric possibly work?

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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
That's an interesting thought.  It's hard to say.  You would think that painting it would do that, but unlike other paints, dye na flow really sinks in rather than 'coating" and making a hermetically sealed surface. I imagine it is rather porous.  Let me see if I can do a proof of concept test today.  I will post pictures.  
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Ivy Ivy
I like the No-flow idea. Dye-na-flow behaves visually so much like a dye that when you overdye it, it has a tendency to do the same thing that textile dyes do when you dye one color on top of another - the 2 colors with visually combine to make another color. This probably won't happen if you absolutely SATURATE the fabric with the Dye-na-flow so that the dye has no chance of reaching and bonding with the fiber, but that would defeat the purpose of using he Dye-na-flow. Too much Dye-na-flow can act like any other acrylic - it dries stiff. 
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Stitchlord
Guess I'll find out! I ordered a bunch of supplies and I'm going to test a bunch of different methods to see what works best for this. I'll report back my findings. It'll be awhile before Dharma is able to get to my order.
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Jacquardmod Jacquardmod
Good luck!  Deceptively complex.  They did a good job making something that would have been expensive and labor intensive at the time look old and threadbare and old.  
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